Press

The press items below include interviews or quotes from Daniel Sparks.

Members of the press may send a message to Mr. Sparks via the contact form.

 

Selected Articles

Terri Schindler: a year’s agony

One year ago today, Terri Schindler (Schiavo) began the slow and agonizing path of starvation and dehydration, as the nutrition tube was removed from her body. Terri, as you hopefully recall, was brain-damaged and in hospice. Sadly, some of the very persons who should have sought to preserve her life actually fought to end it. Her husband (whose hopes to move on with his adulterous life were more important than the life of his wife) had convinced a morally bankrupt Florida judge to order the starvation of Terri.

While American citizens watched on television, listened by radio, and read by Internet, the legal battle was fought to the very end. Terri’s parents and siblings made every possible legal effort to save her from the cruel and unusual death she suffered. Despicably, those intent on murder were successful in their quest. Despite rumblings from President George Bush, the U.S. Congress, the Florida legislature, and Florida Governor Jeb Bush, the conspirators of disaster worked their wileful deed. As Terri lay conscious, painfully aware that she was thirsting to death, her husband and his attorneys congratulated themselves on their endeavor.

Although this situation seems reminiscent of a horror story, it actually happened. The events played out publicly in Pinellas Park, Florida. Millions of Americans were aware of the sadistic state-sanctioned murder of this innocent woman. Thousands gathered outside the hospice where Terri lay dying; they were there to encourage her parents and siblings, to pray for God’s intervention, to seek justice from the secular authorities. Press conferences were called; demonstrations were held; prayer gatherings were organized; public and private entreatments for intervention were proffered. Sadly, the deed was begun and carried to its end.

A year ago, I wrote some things about this harsh event. I was present for a few days at the concentration camp hospice where Terri was incarcerated. The local police were out in force to ensure that no one carried food or water to Terri. They were also present in her room to ensure that she be allowed to die the unnatural death that was inflicted upon her. I saw a few familiar faces among the crowds, and met many common citizens who came to weep and pray.

I will offer a few more reflections over the coming days. Terri should long be remembered. She should be remembered because she is one of God’s children, valuable simply because she was created by him. She should be remembered because she was a public sacrifice for the seared conscience of an increasingly godless people. Let us not forget Terri Schindler, the lady who was butchered by the blood-stained hands of politically powerful reprobates.

Columbia, South Carolina

Today, I made a leisurely excursion through parts of Columbia, South Carolina. I have found my trails to lead here several times over the past few years. There are many beautiful areas in the city, particularly the older downtown area. The history of the state shows in the old buildings and historical sites.

On previous trips to Columbia, I visited the South Carolina Confederate Relic Room & Museum and the South Carolina State Museum. Both contained interesting displays.

One of the places I visited today was the statehouse. The South Carolina State House is a beautiful old capitol building with lush grass, shrubs, and trees. Inside the building are sparkling marble walls and monuments. On the first floor, the brickwork in the arches is plain and covered with white paint, but stately, nonetheless. The green and gold of the upper level ceilings offset the rich woodwork of the walls.

Perhaps the most interesting items I saw in the statehouse were two brilliantly-colored paintings hanging over the two main staircases. Pictures are below, taken from the website of the statehouse–though these photos do no justice to the true beauty of the paintings.

The first painting is by Robert Wilson and depicts the “Battle of Kings Mountain” from the Revolutionary War.

Battle of Kings Mountain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The second painting is also by Robert Wilson and depicts the “Battle of Cowpens” from the Revolutionary War.

Battle of Cowpens

 

 

The Ten Commandments and the Alabama National Guard

Yesterday, the Mobile Register reported that Alabama Governor Bob Riley claims that former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore asked Governor Riley to call out the Alabama National Guard in order to stop the removal of the Ten Commandments monument from the state judicial building in 2003. Chief Justice Moore had installed the monument in the courthouse and a federal court had ordered him to remove it; he refused and was later removed from office because of state ethics charges that were brought against him on the basis of his refusal to comply with the federal court’s unlawful order.

In 2003, I was involved in a citizen presence on the grounds of the state judicial building (which houses the Alabama Supreme Court). While that event has been called a “protest”, much more than protesting was involved. Yes, we were there to protest the federal judge’s unlawful order; we were also there to pray, to encourage our state and federal officials to do the right thing, and to show that we were concerned about the public acknowledgment of God. We were there to send the message that forcibly removing and prohibiting the acknowledgment of God from society can only result in the destruction of a free society–that those who have their law founded not on the authority of God but on the sinful whims of men’s hearts shall destroy themselves.

I was also present at the state capitol in 1997 when Governor Fob James and others spoke at a rally in support of Judge Roy Moore, who was at that time a circuit judge. Judge Moore had been ordered by a state court to remove a hand-carved Ten Commandments plaque from the wall of his courtroom and to stop allowing prayer before trials. He refused to comply with the order and the order was eventually overturned by the Alabama Supreme Court on a technicality.

During that Ten Commandments struggle, Governor James stated that, if necessary, he would call up Alabama National Guard soldiers to stop the removal of the Ten Commandments plaque from Judge Moore’s courtroom. Governor James proved himself not one to make idle threats, so his statement was considered quite seriously. He went on to explain that, were the Ten Commandments plaque ordered by a federal court to be removed, and were federal marshals sent to remove the plaque, he would place Alabama soldiers at the courthouse to prevent the removal. Governor James stated that this would not have resulted in armed conflict; instead, it would have forced President Bill Clinton to either ignore the order of the federal judge and recall the marshals or to federalize the Alabama Guard soldiers and order them away from the courthouse. In Governor James’ estimation, no U.S. president would ever do such a thing.

Coming back to 2003 events, it seems that former Alabama Supreme Court Justice Terry Butts, who served as a legal adviser for Chief Justice Moore, approached Governor Riley about the Ten Commandments monument. Mr. Butts asked Governor Riley to protect the monument from the unlawful order of the federal judge and to prohibit it from being removed. Apparently, Governor Riley has now stated that Judge Moore asked him to call in the Alabama National Guard. Mr. Butts has stated that he did not ask that the Guard be called in but that they did discuss the possibility that things might play out to that end if Governor Riley were to act to protect the monument. According to radio reports today, Judge Moore has denied asking that the Guard be called out to the judicial building and has stated that he agrees with Mr. Butts’ version of the story.

Why this matter is a big news story in the state today, I am not sure. Use of Alabama soldiers was promised by Governor James back in 1997. Thus, the 2003 discussion was not a new idea.

For some reason, commentators feel the need to make a big issue out of this now and to paint Judge Moore as a man filled with bloodlust–the idea being that, if the Guard soldiers were called out, a shootout with federal marshals would result. This is an absurd interpretation of the facts and seems only to be an attempt to undermine Judge Moore’s credibility. And, if weighing Governor Riley’s credibility against Judge Moore’s, Judge Moore wins every time. After all, Judge Moore has fulfilled every public promise he’s made and Governor Riley has broken so many of his own.

The limitation of governmental power

General Douglas MacArthur left us many words of serious thought. Among them were these about the limitation of governmental power (from his pictorial autobiography Duty, Honor, Country, page 210):

There are many who have lost faith in this early American ideal and believe in a form of socialistic, totalitarian rule, a sort of big brother deity to run our lives for us. They no longer believe that free men can successfully manage their own affairs. Their thesis is that a handful of men, centered in government, largely bureaucratic not elected, can utilize the proceeds of our toil and labor to greater advantage than those who create it. Nowhere in the history of the human race is there justification for this reckless faith in political power. It is the oldest, most reactionary of all forms of social organization. It was tried out in ancient Babylon, ancient Greece and ancient Rome; in Mussolini’s Italy, in Hitler’s Germany, and in all communist countries. Wherever and whenever it has been attempted, it has failed utterly to provide economic security, and has generally ended in national disaster. It embraces an essential idiocy, that individuals who, as private citizens, are not to manage the disposition of their own earnings, become in public office supermen who can manage the affairs of the world.

We struggle against this tyranny of idiocy today.