Martin Luther
Don’t

Don’t believe everything you hear.
Don’t speak everything you know.
Don’t do everything you can.

— Martin Luther

Quoted in Luther on Leadership by Stephen J. Nichols, p. 65.

sermonaudio.com

Two men named Jesus

1 John 5:4-13

Walking Through Twilight

Ministering to a spouse with aphasia

In the latest episode of the “Mortification of Spin” podcast, the hosts interview Dr. Douglas Groothuis about his book Walking through Twilight: A Wife’s Illness, A Philosopher’s Lament. Dr. Groothuis’ wife Becky suffers from primary progressive aphasia, a condition that affects the ability to speak, read, and write. It can also affect understanding and memory.

During the interview, Dr. Groothuis speaks about the changes he and his wife have been undergoing. He addresses how his faith impacts his care for Becky and how Christians can provide support to families with this type of illness. I found Dr. Groothuis’ remarks helpful, and I look forward to reading this book soon so I can understand how to provide pastoral care for individuals and families experiencing the difficulty of this illness.

Groothuis reflects on his role as his wife’s primary caregiver. He shares with us his personal suffering and life’s dynamics in light of her illness, the ministry of the body of Christ, and how God is glorified through it all

Source: Mortification of Spin – Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals

On the resurgence of confessional Anglicanism

There is a resurgence of confessional Anglicanism in the United States.

What do I mean by “confessional” Anglicanism? I mean an Anglican identity based on the Reformation principles outlined in the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion of 1571 and put into practice through the liturgy of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer. Confessional Anglicans are Protestant, Reformed, evangelical–descriptors that would be redundant in an earlier age. Confessional Anglicans truly believe in the doctrines of the Reformation and want the worship of the church to be shaped by these biblical principles.

Confessional Anglicans do not view the Articles as a solely historical document locked in a particular era of time that only provides an antiquated snapshot of a quaint “golden age” of the English church. No, these are Anglicans of substance. These are folks who see the Articles as a confession of Reformed Protestant belief and practice that is binding today. These are Anglicans committed to the Bible, the creeds, and the doctrines of grace.

They are not interested in a monarchical episcopate, medieval views of the sacraments, milquetoast preaching, and ritualism. Instead of imitating the entrenched errors of Rome and Constantinople, they want a Christ-centered worship, filled with biblical preaching, right use of the sacraments, and godly discipline. They want to hear the Word of God read with authority, preached with authority, believed with authority. They want a liturgy that serves as a bellows to fan gospel flames.

This sort of Anglican has been around for a long time. However, in the United States, the slant of Romish ritualism has almost strangled the confessional witness of Anglicanism. Today, through casual connections and informal discussions, confessionalism is gaining steam. This means there are Anglicans who relish being called Protestants and Calvinists. They take joy in expository preaching and speaking on critical issues with clarity–instead of the “Anglican doublespeak” of many church leaders, both liberal and conservative.

Confessionalism is not monolithic, either among Anglicans or other Reformed churches. How this growing grassroots movement of churchmen will solidify remains to be seen. For the present, these reformational Anglicans are developing relationships with like-minded believers, both within and without their own denominations. Some of them may be found in surprising places. In any case, the church needs their witness, their call to return to the Scriptures, to a confessing faith.

SmallChurchMusic.com

If you’re a small parish with few resources for church music, SmallChurchMusic.com is for you.

Ways you can use this site:

  • If you don’t have an organist, download the accompaniment tracks to play for services.
  • If you need sheet music, download it here.
  • Find lyrics to hymns.
  • Cross reference hymns that share the same tune.

Thanks to the hard work of recording, scanning, typing, and uploading done over many years, Mr. Clyde McLennan from Perth, Australia has given the church a vast treasury of musical resources.

Music Resources for congregational and small group singing. Audio MP3 files, midi files, PDF scores and lyrics available.